Selected Work

Counter-Signals 2: Hieroglyphics of the Anti-Commodity

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Counter-Signals is a periodically produced journal that addresses convergent aspects of design, media, and politics. The second issue is introduced by a reading of Seth Seigelaub’s introduction to Communication and Class Struggle, and broadly considers, through a series of essays, art works, and documentary reproductions, the multiple contradictions that condition specific instances of political communication and publishing.

An ongoing interest of this publishing project is in the construction of a new “counter-public” — that is, a notional community of readers and producers that is not already assembled in either the academy, the art world, activist circles, or professional design worlds. An important aspect of this project, therefore, is the construction of a network of distribution, through launches, art book fairs, and correspondence with readers and booksellers.

The issue includes contributions from Alan Moore, Chris Reeves, Lucy Mulroney, T’ai Smith, Lisa Vinebaum, Eirik Steinhoff, Nane Diehl, Jennifer Scappettone, Francesco Marullo, John A. Tyson, David Bennewith, Charlotte Taillet and Joel Colover, Josh MacPhee, Christopher Burke, Chris Lee, Tom Fisher, Alexander Negrelli, Nellie Kluz, Juliette Cezzar, TXT-books, and Bertolt Brecht.

2017
Edited by Jack Henrie Fisher

Printed by Kopa, LT
Published by Other Forms

220 pp., 6.5 x 9.25 inches

Edition of 500

Website➜

HIDESIGN: School of Architecture, University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa

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At the core of this visual identity is a new display typeface, based on Helvetica. All non-Hawai’ian letters in this typeface are crossed out, or overwritten, by a rotated line. The typeface thus aims to make visible the post-colonial linguistic and political conflicts of the Hawai’ian islands. The elements of the visual identity include the typeface, a grid of rotated sticks (in a reference to Polynesian cartography), a mobile rainbow arch, and a palette of blues.

Alongside a published manual of the visual identity system — which communicates not only its forms but also its political and historical contents — I developed a website, architectural signage, exhibition catalogues, and posters for lecture series in the academic years of 2015–16, 2016–17, and 2017–18.

Website➜

Belladonna Collaborative

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Belladonna* is a feminist avant-garde collective, founded in 1999 by Rachel Levitsky. The Belladonna* mission is to promote the work of women writers who are adventurous, experimental, politically involved, multi-form, multicultural, multi-gendered, impossible to define, and unpredictable and dangerous with language.

As part of an ongoing collaboration with this publisher, I have designed three books and a set of print ephemera. In every case I work closely with the authors and editors to develop typography and design that is consonant with the publisher’s interests in gender and relations of power.

Subsisters: Selected Poems by Uljana Wolf
translated from the German by Sophie Seita
2017
188 pp., offset BW, 6 x 8 inches
Edition of 2000

Theory, A Sunday by Louky Bersianik, Nicole Brossard, France Théoret, Gail Scott, Louise Cotnoir, Louise Dupré, Lisa Robertson, and Rachel Levitsky.
1988/2013
162 pp., offset BW, 6 x 8 inches
Edition of 2000

Every Poster Is a Political Poster

The headline on this poster rewrites the sentence “Every Prisoner is a Political Prisoner” on top of a bitmapped version of the “The 20th Century Poster” by Wolfgang Weingart. Weingart is the Swiss arch-formalist for whom content, let alone politics, is supposed to be superfluous. This poster was provoked by a request from Princeton Architectural Press to publish a “political poster.” It debuted at the New York Art Book Fair 2017.

Silkscreen, 18 x 24 inches.
Edition of 100
Published by Other Forms
2017

Scapegoat: Architecture / Landscape / Political Economy

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Scapegoat is an independent journal for investigation into the political stakes of architectural production. The journal examines the relationship between capitalism and the built environment, confronting the coercive and violent organization of space, the exploitation of labour and resources, and the unequal distribution of environmental risks and benefits. Throughout our investigation of design and its promises, we return to the politics of making as a politics to be constructed.

Over the course of six issues, from 2014 to the present, I have continually redesigned this architectural journal, developing minimal typological parameters — title, body, citation, image, annotation — with which to constantly vary the editorial form.

7.5 x 9.25 inches
Print on demand

Counter-Signals 1: Militant Print / A Form Oriented To Its Own Circulation

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“Militant Print,” the first issue of Counter-Signals, documents and theorizes forms of militant aesthetics in the history of self-organized print publishing. The issue includes contributions from Mladen Dolar, Katharina Stadler, Thomas Fisher, Emma Holmes, Danielle Aubert, Mary Ikoniadou, T’ai Smith, Lucy Mulroney, Eirik Steinhoff, Nasrin Himada and Denise Ferreira da Silva, Léo Favier, Nicolás Pradilla, Alan Smart, Nasrin Tabatabai and Babak Afrassiabi, Josh Macphee, and Lewis Mumford.

The first issue focuses on a range of publications from the worlds of art, literature, design, and politics that were produced under independent conditions and exhibit related aesthetic features of conflict and immediacy. The issue additionally postulates a contemporary militant aesthetic of the medium of print itself, as it becomes obsolescently figured by a present in which prevailing digital and electronic forms of communication have become increasingly dominated by markets and capital.

2017
Edited by Jack Henrie Fisher

Printed by Cassochrome, BE
Published by Other Forms

184 pp., 6.5 x 9.25 inches

Edition of 750

Website➜

Carrie Secrist Gallery

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We created a new visual identity, website, gallery signage, and posters for this Chicago gallery of contemporary art. Responding to the coincidence of a newly designed interior gallery space with a new online domain, we developed the gallery’s identity in the figure of an empty and flexible box: referring both to the gallery’s physical “white cube” and the box structure of HTML. The website, signage, and ephemeral printing each make this figure visible in unique and medium-specific ways. This work was done in collaboration with designer Jonathan Krohn.

2014–

Website➜

Last Unused Combinations

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In this installation at the Chicago Design Museum we published letter-sized sheets, printed in a historical range of technologies, with fragments of statements excavated from prophetic and revolutionary political and design texts of the twentieth century. These fragments were syntactically organized into three types of sheets — noun-triangle, verb-slash, and auxiliary-circle — and set in stacks at the base of the installation. Three empty sentence structures were articulated by a grid of shapes. Exhibition guests were asked to fill in the syntactic slots with matching sentence fragments, producing new sentence combinations over the course of the show.

Sheets on top of sheets were affixed in growing stacks. New statements, urgent and backward-looking, conjured old militancies and new nonsense. These statements were organically archived in the installation were retroactively transcribed and published in a print-on-demand book. This work was done in collaboration with Jonathan Krohn and Alan Smart.

The Production of New Typefaces Is Only A Necessity Under Capitalism

The text on this poster is from a letter written by Jan Tschichold to Josef Albers on 8 December 1931. The letter was published in Active literature: Jan Tschichold and New Typography by Christopher Burke (Hyphen Press, 2008). It debuted at the Los Angeles Art Book Fair 2017.

Silkscreen, 18 x 24 inches.
Edition of 200
Published by Other Forms
2017

Making Room: Cultural Production in Occupied Spaces

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This book is an anthology of texts on art and media practices in the context of squatting, occupation, and urban space activism. It includes pieces by activist researchers working between the academy and the movements they write about, as well as journalistic first-person narratives by squatters, original photography, and interviews with artists, theorists and activists involved in struggles over urban space and creative production in the city.

Various materials for this publication were collectively arranged and edited by activists and writers at the Centro Sociale Occupato e Autogestito, in Rome, Italy. The book was first printed in Barcelona by the self-managed workshops of Los Malditos Impresores, and co-published by The Journal of Aesthetics and Protest. It was later printed in a larger offset run and distributed by Distributed Art Publishers. An exhibition, composed of risograph prints of images and texts from the book in novel arrangements, was held at ABC No Rio in September 2015.

Edited by Alan Smart and Alan Moore

Printed by Permanent, HK
Published by Other Forms

358 pp., A5 (148 x 210 mm)
Edition of 1000

Dum Ditty Dum

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Dum Ditty Dum is a blog and serial print publication project I initiated with the music critic Gene Booth. In a series of collaborative writings, published online and in print, we explore the sense of Theodor Adorno’s assertion that, with the invention of the phonograph record, “music, previously conveyed by writing, suddenly itself turns into writing” in the specific domain of recorded rock music.

In a series of zines, Dum Ditty Dum is publishing a complete history of rock music, by focusing on specific random days in its history. The first issue considers October 28, 1977 and the second March 28, 1987. The third, currently in production, considers the conjuncture of rock recordings and political economic events on the day of November 7, 2012.

Website➜